The Secret to Taekwondo Kicking

TaeKwonDo TangSooDo HapKiDo KukSoolWon HwarangDo ChunKukDo TaekKyeon

Bruce Lee Learned Taekwondo Kicking From Grandmaster Jhoon Rhee

Taekwondo is one of the most systematic and scientific Korean traditional martial arts, and instills much more than physical self defense, kicking and punching skills. Some know it for the sport division featured in the Olympic games. However, the majority of men, women and children practice Taekwondo for a healthy, fun recreation and the amazing benefits of the traditional and cultural aspects of the art. It is a discipline that reveals a way of enhancing our spirit and life through correct training our body and mind.

Bruce Lee Kicks with Jhoon Rhee on a Beach


This trademark kicking style is featured in various Korean martial arts including Kuk Sool, Hwarang Do, Hapkido, Hanmudo, Yudo, Tang Soo Do, Choi Kwang Do, and major organizations such as the World TKD Federation (WTF), the International TaeKwon-Do Federation (ITF), the American Taekwondo Association (ATA), as well as many others.

John Nottingham Pulgueksa Temple Korea


The secret to advanced Taekwondo kicking is found in three essential components.

First, a foundation of correct form and proper mechanics must be built. This is developed through specialized drills and training routines that build strength, control and proper body movement. In Taekwondo, special emphasis is placed on core strength, hip and low back conditioning to enable the range of motion for proper kicking. The conditioning provides a harmony of strength, flexibility and timing. Together these form a potent combination that is the foundation for exotic, practical and powerful kicking techniques.

Flexibility drills such as dynamic stretch kicking, passive stretches and P.N.F. (resistance/contraction) stretching help improve range of motion, control and the ability to place kicks with pin point accuracy. The dynamic and plyometric kicking speed drills condition the muscles and nervous system to be explosive and lightning fast. This usually consists of breaking down the kicking mechanics into its sub movements, such as lifting the knee to chamber a kick. The drill would include starting from a sparring stance, chambering the knee as rapidly as possible for a set period of time – perhaps 30 seconds. It is followed by a rest cycle then repeated.

John Nottingham Flying Side Kick Punch


Another tool for developing advanced kicking is the variety of kicking paddle drills. A kicking paddle is a Taekwondo practicioners target used to simulate a moving human. The Taekwondoist has to anticipate and attack the target while in motion, adapting to ever changing distance and timing. They learn to point the knee, stay relaxed and adopt a highly versatile sparring stance to be able to change quickly and capitalize on opportunity.

The next secret to Taekwondo kicking is the use of the hip. In the above photo you can see Black Belt Anthony Miles of USA Martial Arts Phoenix speed breaking bricks with a spin side kick. The power in his kick comes from momentum, torque (from turning the hip) and great side kick mechanics (alignment). He does a great job of lining up his kick to drive through the bricks and concentrating his force in a small area.

To increase range of motion, a Taekwondo practicioner will strive to stay relaxed to enable efficient movement. Next, they will adopt a versatile stance and make use of their arms by swinging them to initiate faster adaptation, rotation, torque and mobility.

The advanced jumping and spinning kicks are developed by practicing a variety of jumping and spinning drills. The common trait of all great kickers is the willingness to practice consistently over time. Perhaps this is the greatest secret of great kicking.

One of the formulas many competitors use is to practice every kick they know ten times on each side for a session. Another classic method is to throw 1000 kicks a day. Of course, the best training protocol depends on your level, body, goals and guidance from a qualified teacher.

In Korea, most children practice Taekwondo kicking with a spirit of play. They accumulate a high volume of kicking repetitions in addition to regular Taekwondo class attendance. The demonstration teams also use friendly competition to encourage advancement and higher levels of difficulty and skill.

John Nottingham High Roundhouse Kick Korea Folk Village

More on Taekwondo and Advanced Kicking at this article.

For more information on taekwondo kicks, taekwondo, taekwondo kick, taekwondo flying kicks click here.

http://ScottsdaleTaekwondo.com

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